How To Prepare For Short-Term Lost Income Before It Happens : The Saturday Weekend Review #207

    WHEN YOU NEED A FEW DAYS OFF FROM WORK WITHOUT PAY THAT LOSS OF INCOME CAN CAUSE FINANCIAL STRAIN ON YOUR BUDGET.   Lost income can happen when you catch the flu and must call in sick to work. This means you’ll be short money on your next pay cheque and won’t earn as much money as you expect to. Most employers won’t cover your wages if you are off for a few days to a week and even ask for a doctor’s note which may cost you upwards of $50 out of your own pocket. Related: Doctors admonish employers for requesting sick notes, send $50 invoices. Work benefits for short-term might not kick in until after a specific time away from the job.It’s best to know what’s covered and what you need to cover yourself. If you opt out of paying into your work benefits program it’s best to make sure that you are covered somehow, somewhere ahead of time. Rely on no one but yourself! The best income protection is your own because you don’t have to fight anyone for that nor do you have to wait to get the cash you need. Any time an […]

What to Expect With Little to No Retirement Savings : Our June 2016 Budget Report

UNDERSTANDING HOW RETIREMENT WILL AFFECT YOU NOW IS BETTER THAN FINDING OUT LATER WHEN TIME IS NOT ON YOUR SIDE.   If you’re tired hearing about how much money you should have in your retirement savings to live comfortable in the golden years and want to hide because you’re not part of this elite group of savers- you’re not alone. Company pensions, in particular defined pension plans are becoming a perk of the past and Canadians are left will few options when it comes to retiring without living the rest of their years poking through a tight budget. I’d love to retire early but since the birth of our son we’ve seen our life goals change significantly where we were content living mortgage free in our house and living happily ever after. Now we are talking about buying a bigger house to have more room for our son to run around along with an in-ground pool. That means we’ll need to save even more money if we hope to pay cash for the next house or face added debt of a mortgage loan once again. Related: Retiring Early Should Never Be Expected I received an email from a reader who […]

The 2016 Federal Budget is in: What Does it Change for You?

IT’S IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND DETAILS OF THE NEW BUDGET   The new Liberal government rolled out their 10 year spending and tax plans on Tuesday, March 22nd. In a nutshell, the 2016 Federal Budget focuses on putting more cash in the pockets of low and middle-income families and on improving the infrastructure in cities and in aboriginal regions. If you don’t have time or just don’t feel like reading through the 271 page document, here is a summary of a few key changes that will affect the majority of Canadians and may affect you if you fall in the category.   Are you in the “Middle-Class”?   The definition is a bit unclear, but the new budget benefits families earning less than $150,000 per year and individuals in the second tax bracket ($45,282 to $90,563). Most of the benefits in this budget have been targeted to the majority of Canadians who fall within that definition, and marginal tax rates were reduced by 1.5% at the end of 2015 for the second tax bracket. If your family income exceeds $150,000 or your individual income puts you in a higher tax bracket, then you will not benefit from most of these changes […]

To Take Or Not Take Early CPP

CANADA PENSION PLAN DILEMMA   My husband just turned 62 and we’ve been in a quandary about whether he should take his Canadian Pension Plan (CPP) early (before 65) with penalty or not. We’re both still working and plan to be for the next 4 years while we pay off a whack of debt. Because of penalties introduced in 2012, the amount you receive by taking your CPP early is less than before this legislation was introduced. Let me try to walk through the peculiarities of our situation and how we reached our final decision.   The CPP Rules   While I can’t walk you through all the rules, I will highlight the key ones or ones that were relevant for us but refer you to the CPP website which is actually pretty clear.  I just want to point out that the Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) has a different set of rules, up front. Normally CPP was collected at 65, with penalties and premiums if you elected to take it anytime from age 60 to 65, or from age 65 to 70. Contrary to popular belief, with the new rules introduced in 2012, the age for CPP has not changed […]