Financing Your Kid’s Future With The Canada Child Benefit

Here’s Hoping The New Canada Child Benefit Will Be A Boost For RESP’s   Paying for your kid’s post-secondary education is going to be expensive.  Like.  Really, really expensive. I have a 6-year-old so I think about this a lot. Tuition and books will run you about $7,000 today. But when you add some more on to account for the requisite buses and beers, that number jumps to at least $10,000 – and that’s if they live at home with you. Tack on a modest 3% inflation rate to that, to project 15 years out, and you’re looking at $16,000 a year, for probably four years.  That’s a total of $64,000. Breathe. Just breathe. The $64,000 question:  Is the Canada Child Benefit part of the answer? This is, quite literally, the $64,000 question. And it is better to ask it – and ideally answer it – as soon as possible to give you as much time as possible to save. Perhaps the new Canada Child Benefit will help. The Canada Child Benefit, or CCB, is a new program aimed at helping families with the cost of raising children today and into the future. The cheques (or direct deposits) arrived in […]

The 2016 Federal Budget is in: What Does it Change for You?

IT’S IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND DETAILS OF THE NEW BUDGET   The new Liberal government rolled out their 10 year spending and tax plans on Tuesday, March 22nd. In a nutshell, the 2016 Federal Budget focuses on putting more cash in the pockets of low and middle-income families and on improving the infrastructure in cities and in aboriginal regions. If you don’t have time or just don’t feel like reading through the 271 page document, here is a summary of a few key changes that will affect the majority of Canadians and may affect you if you fall in the category.   Are you in the “Middle-Class”?   The definition is a bit unclear, but the new budget benefits families earning less than $150,000 per year and individuals in the second tax bracket ($45,282 to $90,563). Most of the benefits in this budget have been targeted to the majority of Canadians who fall within that definition, and marginal tax rates were reduced by 1.5% at the end of 2015 for the second tax bracket. If your family income exceeds $150,000 or your individual income puts you in a higher tax bracket, then you will not benefit from most of these changes […]

grocery game monthly challenge

Is one cent a grocery price savings? : The Grocery Game Challenge #1 Mar 31- Apr 6, 2014

DEAL OR NO DEAL?   Pack it in for the one cent day coming to a grocery store near you. Now if it were the million dollar penny that might be a different story but it’s far from it. We always have our eyes peeled on grocery prices when shopping but this was one deal that had us a bit stumped. Now normally a good deal is too good to miss so when I saw this latest deal I was more than a little confused. It’s not only grocery stores posting one cent savings we’ve seen it on Facebook with airline bookings as well. While out shopping with my wife at the supermarket I came across a deal that looked strange to begin with. The small pack of donuts in the picture above were originally marked for $1 but there was a one week sale on that no one could resist, What was the deal? Well it’s clear from the photo that you could save a whole 1 cent. Wow I hear you cry, that’s not a particularly good deal at all. That’s what initially thought until I got thinking about and then realized that there is NO DEAL, or […]

Mr.CBB’s Personal Finance Reading List #8~ Working Past Age 65

It was no surprise that many Canadians believe they will be working past the age 65. Why? It’s pretty obvious that times are getting  tougher and people are struggling to with debt or simply trying to find a job  or one that pays well. We hear about students graduating from University and College with thousands upon thousands of dollars of debt and although we urge students to get their finances in order before school the cost of an education is the beginning of a dirt pit of debt for most. Best of it is many students are struggling to find work in their field and yes sometimes an apprenticeship trade can be better than a University degree simply because the likelihood of scoring a job is better than a field that is saturated with grads that are struggling. It happened in the UK and it’s still happening. Not only that, the Canadian Government motivates men and women to join the trades with incentive grants if they complete levels and journeyman status in a red seal trade. They are practically paying for their education and they can work and earn money while doing it although it’s not for everyone. I think students are starting to realize […]

Making Money on Parental Leave In Canada

  Can I make money while on Parental and Maternity leave? This is a frequent question my Canadian Budget Binder fans want to know. So, I went to Mom Expert Sarah Deveau, Author of Money Smart Mom to share the inside scoop for our fellow Canadians wanting to learn about making some extra money while they are off work caring for their new bundle(s) of joy.   Parental Leave Earnings   Here’s what Sarah has to say…. If you’ve just had a baby and are living on the reduced income of employment insurance maternity or parental leave payments, you might be wondering how to bring in extra income. If you earn income while on the maternity leave portion of the benefit (the first 15 weeks), your earnings will be deducted dollar for dollar from your benefits. If you work while you’re receiving the parental leave benefit, after the first 15 weeks, in the past you’ve been allowed to earn $75 per week or 40% of your weekly benefits, whichever is higher. Any income earned above that amount will be deducted dollar for dollar from your benefits. However, due to the new Working While on Claim (WWC) pilot project, once you have served the waiting period, if your earnings are equal […]