Is It Better To Buy Life Insurance or Fund Your Retirement?

WHICH CHOICE IS BEST FOR YOUR SITUATION?   There is only so much money to go around right? We all have things competing for our hard-earned dollars. Often we have debt, medical expenses, food, shelter, kids, and a hundred other things that all require some amount of money to keep them afloat. But when it comes to protecting yourself by buying life insurance or funding a retirement that is 30 years away, the decision on which is choice makes more financial sense deserves some deeper thought.   Buy Life Insurance Or Invest For Your Future?   If you have kids, a spouse, a mortgage, or other financial commitments you need to ensure that money is available in the event that you unexpectedly die. Where would this come from? Well, a life insurance policy is the best choice if you are under the age of 50 and don’t have liquid money to cover your debts and care for your loved ones. Perhaps the best way to consider the need for life insurance is actually based on your age. For this reason we will go through some typical stages of life, and determine what if any, life insurance should be purchased. You […]

How Should We Budget $5000 of Discretionary Income?

PLAYING WITH SPARE CASH   Not many people can say they have extra discretionary income kicking about every month where they have to drum up ideas about how to spend it.  For those of you that do you can still manage that money with a budget if you want to stay on track with your financial goals. When Mrs. CBB and I paid off our mortgage in April 2014 it was a grand time for us. We managed to break down our mortgage into pieces and pay it off far sooner that we had ever dreamed of. The reason that happened was due to perseverance and a drive to be successful at whatever we did. I guess in a way we were pushing ourselves to earn more money but we knew in the back of our minds that it was all stepping-stones for our dream career roll. Now that our mortgage is paid we have lots of discretionary income which we just recently worked into our budget. Lots of people would be more than tempted to start spending money especially if they’ve hit it big time and the money is rolling in.   What is Discretionary income vs. Disposable Income? […]

grocery game monthly challenge

Top 5 Reasons A Food Budget Is Financially Smart : The Grocery Game Challenge #3 June 15-21, 2015

KNOW WHERE YOUR MONEY IS GOING   A food budget is a huge part of the overall budget in any household whether you decide to use one or not. If you don’t believe me think about how much you pay each time you go to the grocery store and use that to work out your average yearly food expenses. Even though that’s probably the worst way to do it because you probably spend more than you think you are it’s somewhat of a ballpark figure of your yearly expenses. Then again for those of you who do the math this way your final number likely isn’t that important to you but it should be. If you are someone with more money than you know what to do with you might not have a care in the world to know the amount it’s costing you to fuel your body. For those of us who have to worry about balancing our monthly budget a food budget in my opinion is an imperative step to overcoming debt, saving money and balancing the budget. The fact is that whether you document your expenses or choose to just spend your money freely the money will […]

Saving for retirement on a lower-income

EVERY DOLLAR COUNTS   Let’s face it, saving for retirement is tough work. I mean, the concept is not difficult for us to wrap our heads around but finding the money, putting it away consistently and not spending it is challenging stuff. I suspect this is the case because money is an emotional subject and it’s easy to become attached to it; we work hard for it and want to reward ourselves with it. Saving for retirement takes discipline. When you’re not relying on paycheque to paycheque for living expenses, saving some money should be easy enough. You also have options on where to put your money for retirement, into Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs), real estate properties, Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSAs), non-registered brokerage accounts and more. High-income earners are often advised to contribute to their RRSPs in their highest-income earning years, and rightly so. This RRSP account is optimized when you contribute money when your income taxes are the highest, so monies can be withdrawn in the future when you’re in the lowest (or lower) income tax bracket, presumably in retirement. Low-income earners probably shouldn’t follow this advice, and they probably need different financial advice altogether. Today’s post will […]

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